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Author Topic: Backpacking Hammock  (Read 3878 times)

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wsp_scott

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Re: Backpacking Hammock
« Reply #15 on: December 04, 2016, 12:36:19 PM »

Are you thinking of backpacking with it, i.e. sleeping in it all night long? If so, this is a "bigger project" than just buying a hammock.

If you want something to lay in while carcamping or dayhiking, then something like this would probably be fine if you switch out the rope for tree straps.

https://www.amazon.com/WoneNice-Outdoor-Multifunctional-Hammocks-Carabiners/dp/B010DDJ62G/

I'm happy to provide more info if you like. You can also check out hammockforums.net, but be prepared to be overwhelmed :)
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KYhiker40

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Re: Backpacking Hammock
« Reply #16 on: December 04, 2016, 06:40:12 PM »

I agree it can be overwhelming and for that reason I offer this advice.  Keep it simple to start.  You can easily become obsessed with suspension systems, etc, but at the end of the day when you lay down to sleep, as long as you are comfortable and dry, none of these things matter.

I'd suggest in the beginning to buy a hammock that is of an acceptable weight for backpacking, but start by car camping.  This will allow you to play around with hanging methods and find what's easiest for you.  Another benefit of car camping is that you can just throw a wool or fleece blanket in the hammock to sleep on, saving you the expense of an underquilt.  (Yes, a sleep pad works, but it just isn't the same hammock comfort, IMO)

If after a few nights of car camping in a hammock you decide it's for you, then you can start to obsess some and upgrade gear.  Personally, I started with a Grand Trunk hammock and then upgraded to an Eno Double Nest, which i've found to be perfect for me. 

One thing i'm a bit passionate about, if you need to purchase a tarp, I'd strongly suggest silnylon.  The benefits of silnylon make it my favorite piece of gear. 
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kobrakai

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Re: Backpacking Hammock
« Reply #17 on: December 04, 2016, 11:00:13 PM »

I'd suggest in the beginning to buy a hammock that is of an acceptable weight for backpacking, but start by car camping.  This will allow you to play around with hanging methods and find what's easiest for you.  Another benefit of car camping is that you can just throw a wool or fleece blanket in the hammock to sleep on, saving you the expense of an underquilt.  (Yes, a sleep pad works, but it just isn't the same hammock comfort, IMO)

That was my plan exactly.
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thedayhascome

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Re: Backpacking Hammock
« Reply #18 on: December 04, 2016, 11:47:40 PM »

My GF is asking me for Xmas gift ideas and I'd like to try a hammock. Anyone have recommendations for a particular brand or anything specific I should look for?

I would go with a Warbonnet, ENO, or Grand Trunk. Both make several that are lighter than 16oz. I would suggest sticking around that weight, there's no need for a heavy hammock - that's the whole point of hammocking. Definitely try a hammock and give it a go on a short hike out, or car camping. However, You can always take your sleeping pad along in case it doesn't work out.

The CleverHiker site http://www.cleverhiker.com/best-backpacking-hammocks/ does a great summary of day hammocks and sleeping hammocks, I would review those and determine what might make sense for you.

For what it's worth, I use an Eno Sub 7. It's a shorter hammock at only 7.5ft, but I sleep wonderfully in it, and I'm 185lbs @ 6ft.
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I go to Nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put together. John Burroughs

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