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ShifuCareaga

August 30, 2018, 11:32:44 AM
Went on a site survey; got destroyed by chiggers n ticks more than I ever have on any single hike. Land owners were clear cutters. Awful.
 

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Author Topic: Resarch on Hominy holes  (Read 249 times)

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jacksan

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Resarch on Hominy holes
« on: August 27, 2018, 08:09:09 PM »

Larry Meadows, co-author of Rock Art of Kentucky, is doing research on hominy holes and other "processing features" in the area. If you know the location of any please conact him at theredrivermuseum@yahoo.com. Or you might catch him at the Red River Museum in Clay City (859-749-3171). Larry is a really great guy, and the museum is a treasure, and are worth the short trip.

Copper Creek has a picture of a Hominy Hole here: http://www.kywilderness.com/forum/index.php?topic=4407.msg37962#msg37962.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2018, 10:25:55 PM by jacksan »
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Cliftyman

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Re: Resarch on Hominy holes
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2018, 09:31:22 AM »

Is he only interested in hominy holes in RRG?

We have quite a few of them on our farm.  I'd be pretty guarded about sharing those with him unless I was assured he'd keep their location secret, but it would be interesting to talk to someone who knows a lot about them.
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jacksan

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Re: Resarch on Hominy holes
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2018, 11:13:44 PM »

Hominy holes (processing features) are the subject of their current research. He seems to be interested in all Kentucky pre- and early history.

I don't think you have anything to worry about, nowhere are locations given.
A quick google search turned up this on Larry G. Meadows:

Co-Author of "Rock Art of Kentucky"
Co-Author of "Archaeological investigation of the Deep Shelter Cave Run Reseroir area, Rowan County, Kentucky"
Co-author of several chapters of "The Millstone Quarries of Powell County, Kentucky"
Co-Author of "Saltpeter from Sandstone Cliffs in Easter Kentucky in 1806"
Co-author of other publications
Red River Museum, Museum Administrator
Red River Historical Society & Museum, Treasurer
His work is referenced in many other publications.

« Last Edit: September 05, 2018, 07:29:28 AM by jacksan »
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ShifuCareaga

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Re: Resarch on Hominy holes
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2018, 01:41:52 PM »

> You can trust Larry Meadows
> I have my doubts as to the designations. Several of the naming conventions in Rock Art of Kentucky, a resource I cite frequently, are quite wrongly named. There's a lot of guessing in these sort of things.

One example of such misnaming... I was just at Angel Meadows, Indiana, and as usual they have this hilarious story about "chunky stones" and show a bunch of half naked indians all over, and barebreasted women. Which doesn't hardly match photographic evidence of midwestern natives.
Chunky stones are actually whorls, and they are found worldwide. They're a tool for making thread.

The holes may have been used for grinding meal, but a lot of them have odd locations and I have my doubts as to that being the only or main use. I think it will depend on the entire group of evidences at each little hole.

Yes, you should protect them, though they are wonderful!!
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Cliftyman

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Re: Resarch on Hominy holes
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2018, 12:51:45 PM »

We have multiple sites with multiple hominy holes on our property which is a feeder stream of Rough River (though that's as close as I'll say where it is).

One of the sites has rock art in the shape of an arrowhead next to the hole... I've never seen anything like that anywhere else.
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