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April 22, 2018, 07:36:56 PM

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ShifuCareaga

April 12, 2018, 12:34:27 AM
Hang Em High Horse Camp, or White Oak Boat in; north a bit from there near Horse Lick Creek is the S-tree primitive camps, it's actually quite nice.
If you want large, then of course you're back to state park and lake campgrounds.

Pat Curran

April 05, 2018, 05:40:14 PM
I'm looking for info regarding backcountry camping in the DBNF London District, preferably near Buck Creek.  Bee Rock and Rockcastle Campgrounds are both closed and we'd prefer to camp more primitively. Little Lick is small and best suited for horses.
Suggestions?

ShifuCareaga

February 22, 2018, 01:13:51 PM
intending to hit raven's run this Sunday, msg me if you want to go
 

Bazinga

February 10, 2018, 07:00:39 AM
Rain, rain go away. Come again on a weekday!! :'(
 

thedayhascome

December 05, 2017, 09:14:28 AM
Just returned from the Red. Enjoyed beautiful sunrises and the super moon, it was an awesome time!

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Author Topic: Importance of on the ground research  (Read 131 times)

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ShifuCareaga

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Importance of on the ground research
« on: November 24, 2017, 07:33:31 PM »

Well here we are, rapidly approaching year 5 of the project. Started in 2014. And still finding a new falls, that is worthy of mention. On the way to photograph Glen Eden Falls, which was DEFINITELY worth a visit. The new one is on the Blankey Branch, it is a 2 tier falls, and I thought it was gorgeous. It had an upper falls pool, but it isn't immediately clear how to descend into the terrace to use it, will have to ask a local. But this is why I go out on these sojourns all across the state.

BTW the Beattyville Tourism Center and Museum is FREE and has a lot of local WWII history. Down the road is also a Veteran's Memorial wall, again not something I was aware of until I talked to the museum "curator".

I'm sorry I haven't posted this year's trip report about Western KY, but I've been way too busy to post about 40+ locales, and since then I've documented more.

You may be happy to hear KY has edged into "Silver" (86+%) in the tourism data; despite many, many low scoring locations of late.

In lieu of a trip report, I have more research that's been done. I met the author of this text,
https://www.amazon.com/Illustrated-Encyclopedia-Native-American-Earthworks/dp/0940829584/ref=sr_1_fkmr2_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1511069644&sr=8-1-fkmr2&keywords=illustrated+encyclopedia+mounds+and+earth+works+greg+little

The presentation he gave really reminds me of why I have done this research.

This winter I'll be out doing arches, mounds, and hollers, looking for native sites, etc...

If you're curious, there's still 250+ locales left to visit for the book project, so I am unsure I can finish in 2018 or not. I'm trying, but KY keeps producing more and more and more.

My assistant is working part time on many things, but this spring we will begin applying scores and pics to the main map, in hopes of helping people make informed decisions about locations to visit.

But on the ground research is so vital. 

Also, I've noticed an uptick in trash at sites, so please help me to clean up the state!!

BTW I haven't posted the pics from the worst grafiti in the state, because believe me, most of you would be too upset.   It really reminded me of why I'm doing this project.

Take care, and hike safely!
Ramon

ps - saw a new trailcam of a mountain lion that was as muscular as a jaguar. So, also be aware of children, especially in Eastern KY!!
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